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The 'brains' and 'action' heavies who had meaty roles and lots of dialog ... and the players who were fathers, ranch owners, lawman, mayors, judges, lawyers, storekeepers, newspaper editors, wardens, etc.



(Courtesy of Bob Taylor)

Above - an autographed photo from O'Shea to his friend Bob Taylor.


(From Old Corral image collection)

Above is a crop/blowup of O'Shea from the CARAVAN TRAIL lobby card shown below.
Jack O'Shea

Known as:
Black Jack O'Shea and Blackjack O'Shea

Real name: John Martin Rellaford

1906 - 1967


The short and burly Black Jack O'Shea started his film career in the early 1930s and became typecast as a villain, most often with a moustache. He also did stunting and doubled for stars of the period including comedian Lou Costello. Over the years, he worked for most of the western film production companies.

In the late 1940s, he severely injured his leg and/or ankle during a fall or jump from a wagon, and this ended his stunting career. A close friend of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, O'Shea got work in their 1950s TV show, and he also essayed roles in other television programs such as DEATH VALLEY DAYS and THE RANGE RIDER.

He retired and opened an antique store, the J. - R. Tradin' Post on Devonshire Street in Chatsworth, California (see business card below). Later, the business was moved to Paradise, California.

Texan Doug Bruton saw Max Terhune, Bob Steele and Black Jack O'Shea together in a performance at a local theater:

"Bob Steele, Max Terhune and Jack O'Shea came to the Star Theater in Denison, Texas in 1949 or 50. They appeared on stage between the features and put on a little stage show. Bob came out and talked about his career and while he was out on stage, a voice from off-stage called out ... "where is this Steele?" ... "this town is not big enough for both of us." Then Black Jack O'Shea came out and he and Bob drew on each other. Needless to say, Bob shot the gun out of his hand and then they had a dialog. Don't remember all of it, but Bob asked Jack "How many pictures have you been in?". Jack answered "140 Bob". Bob said "How many have you been killed in?". Jack answered "140 Bob!" Then Max did his act with Elmer and was very funny. After the show I ran around to the stagedoor and talked with them for several minutes and as any 12 or 13 year old might do, I asked a thousand questions and they were very patient and friendly."

You may want to go to the In Search Of ... page on the Old Corral and then to the California Death Records database. There you will find a record for: John M. Rellaford, born 4/6/1906 in California, Mother's maiden name of Watts, and he passed away in California on 10/1/1967.

O'Shea's twenty five year movie and television career ran from the early 1930s through the mid 1950s and he appeared in about 200 films, most of which were westerns along with a couple dozen serials.

  Although some of the data is incomplete or inaccurate, the Internet Movie Database (IMDB) has information on Black Jack O'Shea: http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0642648/




(Courtesy of Bob Taylor)

Above is the oversized business card for Jack O'Shea's J. - R. Tradin' Post in Chatsworth, California. The card measures about 3 3/4 inches wide X 2 3/4 inches high. Notice also that O'Shea spells his nickname as "Black Jack" (two words), not Blackjack.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from L-to-R are Jack O'Shea, Earle Hodgins, Harry Woods and Bob Livingston in a duotone re-release lobby card from the Three Mesquiteers adventure, RANGE DEFENDERS (Republic, 1937).



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above center is Roscoe Ates (1892-1962), who rode the trail as singing cowboy Eddie Dean's stuttering sidekick 'Soapy Jones' (he replaced Emmett Lynn who was Dean's first screen helper). Dean is on the right and Black Jack O'Shea is on the left in a still from Dean's TUMBLEWEED TRAIL (PRC, 1946).



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from left to right are Emmett Lynn, Black Jack O'Shea (without his normal moustache), Charlie King and Al LaRue in a lobby card from CARAVAN TRAIL (PRC, 1946), one of Eddie Dean's CineColor westerns.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from left to right are Black Jack O'Shea, Lash LaRue, Charlie King, Eddie Dean and Emmett Lynn in another lobby card from Eddie Dean's CARAVAN TRAIL (PRC, 1946).



(Courtesy of Ed Phillips)

Above from leftto right are Carl Mathews, Kermit Maynard, Matty Roubert and Jack O'Shea in a scene from STARS OVER TEXAS (PRC, 1946) which starred Eddie Dean.



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above from L-to-R are Lee Roberts, Black Jack O'Shea and Matty Roubert in a lobby card from the Lash LaRue LAW OF THE LASH (PRC, 1947). This was Lash's first starring role on his own after working in several Eddie Dean oaters. O'Shea is the brains heavy in this one and is credited as Jack O'Shea.



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above from L-to-R are Leonard Penn and Jim Bannon, and in the stage are Ray Jones and Black Jack O'Shea. From WANTED, DEAD OR ALIVE (Monogram, 1951) which starred Whip Wilson.



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