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(From Old Corral image collection)

Above - Julian Rivero is the Spanish-garbed gent on the far left. William Desmond and Earl Dwire are in the darkened doorway. Blackie Whiteford is restraining hero Tom Tyler, and burly Dick Alexander has the butt of his six-shooter aimed at Tom's head. The heroine is Jean Carmen, who would later change her screen name to Julia Thayer and become the rider of the titled horse in Republic's cliffhanger, THE PAINTED STALLION (Republic, 1937). Prone on the step is Hank Bell, minus his usual moustache. From Tyler's BORN TO BATTLE (Reliable, 1935).



(Image courtesy of Carol Murray and her "Jack Hendricks Photo Album")

Above - the grounded and roped Jack Hendricks is aided by Al St. John and Tom Tyler in TRIGGER TOM (Reliable, 1935). Note the zipper on Tyler's shirt.



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above is a lobby card from SANTA FE BOUND (Reliable, 1936), the last of Tyler's eighteen films for B. B. Ray and Harry Webb at Reliable Pictures. From left to right are Charles 'Slim' Whitaker, Jack Hendricks, Tyler, Ed Cassidy (mustache) and Dick Cramer. Cramer was the brains heavy in this ... and he was billed third as "Richard Kramer" (with a K). In the photo inset on the right are leading lady Jeanne Martel, Tom Tyler, and Earl Dwire. Tyler and Jeanne Martel were husband and wife ... for a brief time.



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above from left to right are Charles 'Slim' Whitaker (without his normal moustache), Tom Tyler, Jeanne Martel (who would become Tyler's real life wife), Ted Lorch, and on the ground is Forrest Taylor. Scene from Tyler's ORPHAN OF THE PECOS (Victory, 1937). In this, Taylor was the brains heavy and Lorch portrayed a "snake-oil salesman".



(Courtesy of Calvin Castine)

Tyler rode what looks like a palomino in films like ORPHAN OF THE PECOS (Victory, 1937) and LOST RANCH (Victory, 1937). This shot is from ORPHAN OF THE PECOS (Victory, 1937). But he also rode a white horse - for example, in RIO RATTLER (Reliable, 1935), Tyler rides Jack Perrin's Starlight.



(From Old Corral image collection)
Supporting players and henchies in the Reliable westerns were quite good and included eleven appearances for Slim Whitaker, six for Charlie King, eleven for George Chesebro, greasy Earl Dwire appeared six times, and sneering Lew Meehan made five appearances.  Producer, Associate Producer, and Director of the entire bunch were alternately filled in by Ray, Webb, and Webb disguised under his alternate name of Henri Samuels.

As for Tom, he really tried but couldn't singlehandidly rise above the production shortcomings which all too often left the viewer feeling that the cast was milling around between gunfights and fisticuffs.  Critics of the time (who were generally unenthusiastic about westerns in general), cited the films as pedestrian yet occasionally threw in some good words about Tom.

But by 1936, the bell was tolling for these independently produced western programmers as the states rights distribution channels, which were utilized for film releasing, were beginning to dry up.  And western film competition, which earlier had carried the anemic brand names of Empire, Superior, Big 4, Imperial, and such, now included polished, well executed work from the newly formed Republic Pictures.  Even Paramount was releasing a new series based on the Hopalong Cassidy stories, and these had big budgets, beautiful exterior locations, and near adult scripting.

The Poverty Row version of the cowboy opus, Tom Tyler's bread and butter, was becoming extinct.



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