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With A. W. Hackel for Republic Pictures (16 Films)



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above - a blue duotone 1950 re-release title lobby card for THE GUN RANGER (A. W. Hackel/Republic, 1937).  Pretty Eleanor Stewart is the heroine, and on the right is prolific baddie Ernie Adams (who seemed to always portray 'weasel' roles in oaters). Steele's father, Robert Bradbury, was the director.  Bob's outfit has changed slightly - still the shirts with arrow pockets and a single sixgun, but the blue jeans are gone, and the hat style is the type he would wear for most of his remaining career.


(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above are Bob Steele and Eleanor Stewart enjoying a tender moment in a lobby card from THE GUN RANGER (A. W. Hackel/Republic, 1937).


(From Old Corral image collection)

Above, Bob Steele has the drop on Earl Dwire in this blue duotone 1950 re-release lobby card from THE GUN RANGER (A. W. Hackel/Republic, 1937), one of the A. W. Hackel produced 'Supreme' westerns that was released by Republic Pictures.


(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above is the title lobby card from the Bob Steele COLORADO KID (1937). This was one of the Newfield directed westerns from producer A. W. Hackel which were released by Republic. That's battlin' Bob with Marion Weldon on the left. On the right, Steele is roughin' up Karl Hackett.


(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above is the title lobby card for PAROLED - TO DIE. In the bottom right circular inset are Steele and heroine Kathleen Eliot. Karl Hackett is in the black suit. Steve Clark is between Steele and Hackett. And Horace Murphy is on the far right.

CAVALRY (Hackel/Republic, 1936) [Director: RNB Sr.]
THE GUN RANGER (Hackel/Republic, 1937) [Director: RNB Sr.]
LIGHTNIN' CRANDALL (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
THE TRUSTED OUTLAW (Hackel/Republic, 1937) [Director: RNB Sr.]
GUN LORDS OF STIRRUP BASIN (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
BORDER PHANTOM (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
DOOMED AT SUNDOWN (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
THE RED ROPE (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
THE ARIZONA GUNFIGHTER (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
RIDIN' THE LONE TRAIL (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
COLORADO KID (Hackel/Republic, 1937)
PAROLED - TO DIE (Hackel/Republic, 1938)
THUNDER IN THE DESERT (Hackel/Republic, 1938)
THE FEUD MAKER (Hackel/Republic, 1938)
DESERT PATROL (Hackel/Republic, 1938)
DURANGO VALLEY RAIDERS (Hackel/Republic, 1938)

[Director: RNB Sr.] indicates films directed by Steele's father, Robert North Bradbury, Sr.

In the Acknowledgment/Thanks page on the Old Corral, I do mention and credit Jack Mathis for several books, including his REPUBLIC CONFIDENTIAL, VOLUME 1, THE STUDIO (Jack Mathis Advertising, 1999).  For those of you with a copy, page 106 is devoted to Republic's contract arrangement with A. W. Hackel for the Steele and Johnny Mack Brown films.  For those without the book, following are the key points:

  • Agreement dated June 15, 1936 between Republic and Supreme Pictures Corporation and owner A. William Hackel.
  • Original agreement called for eight films each for Brown and Steele.
  • Negative costs for each were to average $13,000, with none to cost less than $10,000 nor more than $17,000, and would contain no more than 300 feet of stock footage.
  • Republic had approval on the script, film stock and processing lab.
  • For each title, Hackel would be paid $2500 plus 35% of the net profits on the first sixteen titles, and this dropped to 30% if Republic exercised their options.
  • Four options of eight pictures each were included in the contract, with negative costs escalating from $13,500 in the first option to $16,500 in the last.
  • Republic exercised the first option for eight more Steele films only (as Hackel no longer had Johnny Mack Brown under contract).
  • Republic owned all TV rights.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above - Charlie King and Bob Steele are about to duke it out in THE TRUSTED OUTLAW (Republic, 1937).  Minard Coons chatted with Steele at one of the 1970s conventions, and Steele commented that "they would always do his fight scenes with Charlie king at the end of the filming.  He and Charlie would go out and drink a little lunch then come back, do the scenes, and totally tear the place apart".



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from left to right are Ted Adams, Ernie Adams, and Bob Steele in ARIZONA GUNFIGHTER (Republic, 1937), one of Ted Adams' better supporting roles, playing a reformed gunman.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above - Louise Stanley in a tender scene with Bob Steele circa late 1930s during their films for producer A. W. Hackel. Stanley was married once (or twice) to Monogram western star Jack Randall, Bob Livingston's brother.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above is Steve Clark (sans his normal mustache) with Bob Steele in RIDIN' THE LONE TRAIL (A. W. Hackel/Republic, 1937).


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