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Tim McCoy liked the circus life and performing under the big top.  He toured briefly with the Sells-Floto Circus during 1935, and with the Ringling Brothers Circus for a couple seasons, circa 1936 and 1937. Posters and images on his time with the Ringling show are below.

Around late 1937, McCoy began assembling his own Wild West Show. "Colonel Tim McCoy's Real Wild West Show and Rough Riders of the World" opened at Soldier Field in Chicago in April, 1938 and folded about a month later after a performance in Washington D.C. In his book Tim McCoy Remembers the West (Doubleday, 1977), McCoy notes that his losses were about $300,000.00. Info from the Circus Historical Society website: "The McCoy show closed on May 4, 1938, in Washington, D. C. A public auction was held on August 1, 1938 at the B & O Freight Depot, in Washington. The show had been parked on a siding in that location since the closing."

(Courtesy of Fred D. Pfening, Jr.)




(Courtesy of Fred D. Pfening, Jr.)



(Courtesy of Fred D. Pfening, Jr.)



(Courtesy of Fred D. Pfening, Jr.)

Above, the well costumed Tim McCoy in 1937 with the Ringling Bros, Barnum & Bailey Circus.




(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above - William M. Pizor

As to the lawsuit between McCoy and William Pizor/Imperial, Tim won a judgement along with a cash settlement amounting to $37,000 (his contracted amount of $32,000 plus $5,000 in interest).

On the left is a tradepaper blurb from November 10, 1939. The mention of February, 1926 is a typo - should be 1936.

Imperial Pictures disappeared a short time later. McCoy also became eligible again to do films but would find the going a bit tough due to his age and the impact of the new singing cowboy.



For those into trivia, pay particular attention to the gunbelt that McCoy is wearing in many of the pictures and lobby cards in these webpages.

He's wearing that gunbelt in the still on the right circa 1938. That pattern, design and belt buckle can be seen from his 1930s sound films through his circus and Wild West show appearances, and his time with the Doc Tommy Scott show - a career that would span over forty years.

A crop/blowup from a lobby card is shown below.

(From Old Corral image collection)




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