Back to prior page            Go to next page




(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from left to right are Al Bridge, Harry Carey Sr. and Yakima Canutt in a duotone lobby card from chapter 3 of THE DEVIL HORSE (Mascot, 1932).



(From Old Corral image collection)

In the above duotone lobby card from THE DEVIL HORSE (Mascot, 1932), Frankie Darro is being assaulted by J. Paul Jones who plays the helper to brains heavy Noah Beery, Sr. Coming to Darro's aid is prolific performer Jack Mower who portrays "Adams", the leader of the vigilantes. In this Harry Carey serial, Frankie is "the wild boy", an orphan raised in the wild who befriends a herd of horses. Darro did six cliffhangers for Nat Levine and Mascot: THE LIGHTNING WARRIOR (1931), THE VANISHING LEGION (1931), THE DEVIL HORSE (1932), THE WOLF DOG (1933), BURN 'EM UP BARNES (1934), and THE PHANTOM EMPIRE (1935).



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Ken Maynard's first for Levine and Mascot was the feature IN OLD SANTA FE (Mascot, 1934). Trusty steed Tarzan is prominently mentioned and also note the reference in the center of this title lobby card to:
and
GENE AUTRY
"Cowboy Idol of the Air"




(From Old Corral image collection)

Ken Maynard and Tarzan versus the "Rattler" in MYSTERY MOUNTAIN (Mascot, 1934), 12 chapters, directed by Otto Brower, and the second unit director was B. Reeves "Breezy" Eason. Scuttlebutt was that Maynard was also to star in THE PHANTOM EMPIRE chapterplay. But Maynard was difficult and cantankerous and that didn't endear him to the thrifty boss/owner of Mascot. The end result: Maynard was done at Mascot, and Levine cast Gene Autry as the lead in THE PHANTOM EMPIRE cliffhanger.



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from L-to-R are Smiley Burnette, great rider Betsy King Ross, Gene Autry at the microphone, and Frankie Darro in THE PHANTOM EMPIRE (Mascot, 1935). This was Gene's first starring film, directed by Otto Brower, and the second unit director was B. Reeves "Breezy" Eason. Antagonists were the underground civilization of Murania and its "Thunder Riders". Always in trouble, Gene had to get back to Radio Ranch in order to sing some tunes and do his required radio broadcasts. Autry had signed a contract with Levine and Mascot, and he went along in the mid 1930s deal that formed Republic Pictures with the combining of Mascot, Monogram, et al.



(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above is the title lobby card for Tom Mix's last film, THE MIRACLE RIDER (Mascot, 1935) which was in fifteen chapters. The first episode, titled "The Vanishing Indian", was on five reels, and ran about 43 minutes. The total running time of the serial was about 306 minutes, making it the lengthiest of the sound serials (DICK TRACY was Republic's longest, clocking in at a tad under 290 minutes).



(From Old Corral image collection)

THE VIGILANTES ARE COMING (Republic, 1936), 12 chapters, was directed by Mack V. Wright and Ray Taylor, and Nat Levine was the producer. This 'Zorro-like' adventure was Bob Livingston's first starring serial, and it was among the first batch of serials from the new Republic Pictures Corporation.



Back to prior page            Go to next page