Back to prior page


Don Barry


(From Old Corral image collection)
Above are Wally Vernon and Don 'Red' Barry, and Barry is riding Banner, a bay horse with a narrow face stripe which was his primary mount during his 1940s starring work at Republic Pictures. Vernon and Barry paired up in two different western series - the first was at Republic during the 1940s and the second effort was around 1950 at Lippert Pictures where Barry did GUNFIRE (1950), I SHOT BILLY THE KID (1950), more. Wally Vernon was struck and killed by a hit and run driver in 1970.

On the left are images showing the long, thin face blaze on Banner.

Sky Corbin adds more details to Don Barry's horse: the big bay horse with a narrow stripe down his face is Banner and was ridden by Don in most, if not all his Republic feature-length movies.  Then when Allan Lane replaced Barry, he rode the same horse and dressed much the same. John Wayne rode the same horse in the late 40s and early 50s (in ANGEL AND THE BADMAN, for example).  Andy Devine rode him in the movies he made with Roy Rogers.  That was a busy hoss!

Ken Hicks e-mailed and mentioned that in THE TULSA KID (Republic, 1940) Barry refer to his horse's as Cyclone.

(Regardless of the name that Barry called this horse, if you view THE TULSA KID film, Barry rides Banner.)

(From Old Corral image collection)

When Barry did his guest role in the Roy Rogers' BELLS OF ROSARITA (1945), he was introduced as riding Cyclone during the finale when Roy and the five Republic western heroes appeared at the circus. The above publicity still appears to be from BELLS.



(Courtesy of Minard Coons)

Above, in the 1940 cliffhanger, THE ADVENTURES OF RED RYDER, Don Barry rode a black horse that portrayed Thunder.



Allan Lane


(Courtesy of Les Adams)

Above - Allan Lane and heroine Linda Stirling in a scene from TOPEKA TERROR (Republic, 1945). If you view the TOPEKA TERROR film, Lane does ride Banner. Yet the horse in the above publicity still looks different (face blaze doesn't extend down to the nose).

There's always exceptions to the "who rode what horse?" rule. For example, in SILVER CITY KID, Lane rides a completely different horse with a large white splotch on the forehead.



Sunset Carson


(From Old Corral image collection)

Above, toothless supporting player Tom London gives instructions to Republic Pictures' hero Sunset Carson who is riding the traditional white horse that Sunset used in his Republic features. Appears that Sunset had originally named the hoss Silver, but changed it to Cactus.


(From Old Corral image collection)

Above from L-to-R are Bob Wilke, Sunset Carson, Rex Lease, Jess Cavin (in background), Earle Hodgins, and Pascale Perry (in background) in a lobby card from FIREBRANDS OF ARIZONA (Republic, 1944).



(From Old Corral image collection)

Above, a tender moment between Sunset Carson and pretty Marie Harmon in a lobby card from THE EL PASO KID (Republic, 1946). Regardless of whether Sunset dubbed his Republic white steed as Silver or Cactus, the mount shown in the above two lobby cards is Silver (Silver Chief).



(Courtesy of Minard Coons)

During his later Republic films as well as his 'Wild West Show' personal appearance days, Sunset Carson identified his hoss as Cactus. The photo that Sunset used in the above advertisement and flyer is a Republic publicity still showing him riding Silver (Silver Chief).


Back to prior page